Cover Reveal for The Andromeda’s Ghost

Super stoked to announce that my new adult science fiction/fantasy book has a cover! I got the manuscript back from BHC Press’s editor earlier this month along with some notes and corrections. After two weeks of combing through it myself, I’ve deemed it to be as perfect as it can be. I’ve sent it back to my publisher for formatting. Then it’ll be sent out to reviewers! And once those reviews get in, it’ll be publication time!

The Andromeda’s Ghost is scheduled to be published in July 2020. This is the first book in The Andromeda Chronicles, which will be a trilogy. It’ll be available in ebook, paperback, and hardcover! For more details, feel free to visit the book’s page on BHC Press’ website.

 

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Suddenly I’m…busy?

A quick update on my once boring life:

My classes Planning the Novel and Intermediate Fiction have me writing and reading more than all my past Creative Writing classes combined. The Planning the Novel class includes student workshops so I’ll be submitting some chapters for my classmates to critique in the near future. I’m excited to get feed-back on my novel-in-progress, The Andromeda’s Ghost. I still can’t get over the fact that I get to create fiction (you know, something that I love to do) and turn it in for a grade! I wish I could’ve skipped all the other boring subjects and jumped right into this after I graduated from high school. (No offense to people who actually enjoy History, college Algebra, Biology, and/or Public Speaking classes.) This is what I was meant to do. Despite the overwhelming work load, I’m glad that I’m taking these classes. It’s like how I image most people feel after a good work out: tired but proud of themselves.

Things at work have picked up as we begin Fall Bible studies. More calls, more appointments, more little projects that need help being completed. The quiet summer is officially over.

I just approved a book cover and finished doing a round of copy edits for I Dare You to Love Me. According to my content editor, the manuscript still needs to go through two more rounds of editing before it can be ready to print. It’s always exciting to see my stories taking shape when I’m working on them, but this is a different kind of excitement. I know this book is actually going to be seen and purchased by others. This one is going to make it to the other side, or so to speak. I can’t wait to share it with everyone. In the mean time, I’m getting tons of good advice from my book marketing specialist concerning my social media accounts. After staring at the computer screen with a puzzled/nauseated look on my face for a half hour and clicking on random things to see how this “Professional Facebook account” differs from a personal one, I finally finished my author’s page. I still have to figure out how to make a professional Instagram account and a Goodreads account, so I feel behind.

I saw a sample book cover for In the Dark yesterday and it’s looking great! It just needs a few more tweaks and I think it’ll be ready. Edited to Add: I just heard back from my editor. She’s going to start doing edits on In the Dark this week. Hopefully, I’ll be getting the manuscript back soon!

Bragging about my books and myself is really hard! I’m still struggling to be okay in the spotlight. But I’m taking this one step at a time. Maybe, someday, it’ll come naturally to me. Thanks to all of you faithful readers, retweeters, commentators, followers, friends, and family. You are SO appreciated!

Progress report on Operation Laundry Room Spruce

So a few weeks ago, I got the idea (more like the sudden desire) to spruce up the house one room at a time. I wanted to start with the laundry room because I’ve never actually painted anything before and if I made a mistake…well, nobody would notice unless I directed them to the laundry room and showed them. Here’s a before picture:

 

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It’s a standard laundry room, white walls, white doors, white baseboards, access to the garage on the left, door into our house on the right.

My vision for this room was to add some color to that back wall, the one with the shelf. I considered different shades of teal and turquoise until I found the right shade (not too bright, not too dark) for a windowless room. The other three walls of this room would be painted an off white, creamier and more subtle than the white that’s already on there. Then, along the white walls, I wanted to do some stenciling in the turquoise color. I picked out the stencil at Michael’s; it was a pattern of simple swirls that I thought would look cute.

With my husband’s help, I found everything I needed at Lowe’s and then got to work. Cleaning was obnoxious. I never realized how dirty my laundry room could get! But the taping took the longest. I wanted it to be perfect so I was constantly pulling the tape off and reapplying it, checking and rechecking my lines to be sure they were all even. Once that was done, all I had to do was paint. That was fairly simple; time-consuming, but simple. This is what it looks like now:

 

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The first picture came out a lot darker than I wanted it to. (Stupid camera phone…) In reality, the turquoise is closer to the second picture in darkness.

Onto the stenciling I went, not wanting to lose momentum. I followed the directions and still didn’t get the desired pattern. Every time I pulled the stencil away, one half would look smudged. Still, I kept trying, applying the paint more sparingly and then more liberally with each roll, hoping I’d get at least one right. None of them looked even remotely like the sample picture did, much to my dismay. To salvage all the work I’d done, I simply taped off the squares and made a checkered pattern on the wall instead. This is what it looks like now:

 

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Can you tell I ran out of the one kind of tape and had to send my husband out to buy me some more? He’s been such a good sport through this process.

And that’s exactly what this is: a process. When I first started thinking about what I wanted to do with this room, I naively believed it was a project I could do over the weekend. While I did get most of the work done in one weekend, the job isn’t finished. I took all the tape off the other day and removed some paint in the process. The corners of the walls where the white meets the turquoise peeled, ruining the straight lines I worked so hard to create. I was upset about it at first, but my husband assured me that I could fix the problem with a small, flat brush. Guess what my next task is going to be? Touch ups. Hooray! (I’ll post a picture of the finished look once I’m done. Promise.)

It didn’t turn out quite like I envisioned but isn’t that just like life? Better to roll with the punches and make the best of it than complain about what could have been. Considering this is my first painting project, I’d say it turned out all right. It could’ve turned out a lot worse, I’m sure. I feel that I’ll have more realistic expectations when I start thinking about how I can spruce up the guest bathroom. For that, I’m thankful. As for now, I’m still recovering from all the standing, squatting, and climbing! I need to work out more.

Sprucing up the house

There’s nothing like going to a friend’s house to make you realize how simple your home is.

Don’t get me wrong, I love our house. The living, sitting , kitchen, and dining rooms are open and spacious, perfect for hosting large groups of people. The bedrooms are larger than average. I love my master bedroom. The house was half furnished when we moved in and the rest of our furniture was given to us by friends who were moving at that time or by our parents. When we first decided to move out of our one-bedroom apartment and into a four bedroom house, I was worried that we wouldn’t be able to furnish it. But we were so blessed, so blown away by everybody’s generosity. I’m still amazed at God’s provision. That’s not what I mean by simple.

We’ve been living in our house for a year and two months, and our walls are still pretty bare. The primary reason for this is because the house isn’t ours. It’s a rental and we want to respect our grandparents by refraining from putting a bunch of holes in the walls. But, if I’m honest, I think that’s just an excuse for not trying harder. We haven’t given the house any fresh coats of paint or sanded down the cabinets and given them a nice varnish or gotten new curtains or anything. I don’t feel as if we’ve truly made this house our space. Our only attempts at personalization have been a few wedding photos and the Geek Mantle of Geekiness (featured below.)

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(You can’t tell because of the awful quality of this photo, but the horizontal frame is displaying Harry Potter stamps.)

Maybe it’s because we’ve hit the one year mark. Maybe it’s because I recently visited the homes of two very creative ladies who have expertly decorated their homes, with themes and impressive DIY crafts. Or maybe it’s because I’m growing up a little and I want the house we live in to emulate that. Either way, I’m willing to give it a shot. I’ve been on Pinterest for affordable ideas and I’ve found some DIY projects I’d like to try. I know some ladies who are very handy with canvas and wooden signs, and I’m sure I can hire them to make some cool verse/calligraphy wall art. We live right next door to Lowes and Michael’s is just down the street. I have everything I need to get started.

My only problem is I don’t have a theme or a vision for the interior of my house. I know I want to make it more sophisticated, add some more color, and a personal touch in every room. I’d love to play with stripes and patterns, flowers and nick-knacks in the corners, cool accent pieces and conversation starters. But I don’t want it to be random. There has to be a method to the madness or it’ll look messy and unprofessional. (I feel like I’m about to go on a home improvement show on HGTV or something with this grocery list of things I want for my “new look.”) So all that’s really left to do is research, research, research. Find articles with pictures of spaces I might want to try and then build upon that. Talk to my crafty and creative friends and family members. Look into yard and estate sales in the area for diamonds in the rough. With the end of school in sight, it’s the perfect time to start something new. Naturally, I’ll document my journey with all it’s fails and lessons.

It’s going to be a lot of work but it’ll be fun to transform our house. I can’t wait to get my hands dirty!

Concerning book covers

Inspired by She Latitude’s recent post Top Ten Book Cover Turn Offs (https://shelatitude.com/2017/05/02/top-ten-book-cover-turn-offs/), I’ve decided to write a post about my own experience creating book covers.

Since the day I decided to get serious about my writing and try to get my works published, I’ve wanted to do it the traditional way. I’m insecure about my abilities to sell my own product, so getting an agent and a publishing company to help me do the work has always been appealing. But the more query letter rejects I got, the more discouraged I became. I did my research; I must have read at least twenty articles on the pros and cons of self-publishing and self-publishing versus traditional publishing. I even chatted with some self-published authors through Facebook about their experience with self-publishing. It’s a lot of work, they all said, but it’s worth it! Why? Because the author gets to have complete and total creative freedom, they get to keep all the rights to their work, they get all the money when their books sell, and they don’t have to deal with the middle man or rejection letters.

Sounds perfect, right? Just what I’ve always wanted. But there’s a catch. A huge one. The self-published author has to pay for the publication of their novel. Now, there are websites and softwares designed to help with formatting, editing, getting an ISBN number, getting the book copyrighted, and creating a cover. There are smallish companies willing to do the same things for you, even freelancers who are willing to help. For a fee, of course. I’m not bashing these people; they’re talented and want to make a living off what they do. I totally get that. That’s what the self-published author is trying to do too! But for me, a young adult who is earning two dollars above minimum wage, has to pay for bills, rent, groceries, gas, tuition, school books, and is saving up for a car, and is trying to keep money in the savings account, and is still wearing the same clothes and shoes she bought two years ago, the thought of paying to publish a book is overwhelming. (That’s not to say I’m poor or anything. My husband works too and all our needs are met. We just have priorities and a budget that don’t include publishing my books.)

Anyway, I eventually decided that I should stick to traditional publishing. At least for now. But during the time when I was debating publishing my own book, I did even more research on ways to create spectacular but cheap book covers. The cover of a book is the first thing I look at when browsing through a bookstore or library. If the cover attracts my attention, I read the blurb. If the blurb grabs me too, I’m definitely buying/check out the book. That’s why the blurb and the cover are so stinkin’ important. They have to be engaging, unique, and good enough representations of the content of the book in order to get a reader to take a chance. The book itself could be amazing and a perfect fit for em, but if the cover picture quality is bad or if the picture itself is overly dramatic or tells me absolutely nothing about the book itself, I’m not going to read it. Sad, right? But true.

Knowing all of this, I looked for websites and free photo editing programs online that I might be able to experiment with. I stumbled upon Canva.com thanks to a fellow writer in one of my writer’s forums. Canva has a free version and a membership with a fee, but unlike similar creative websites, Canva actually offers you a variety of stuff for their free members. It offers stock photos, fonts, layouts, icons, background textures, frames, illustrations, and it even gives the option of uploading your own pictures to the site. (Many sites offer “variety” to their free members; Canva is, so far, the only one I’ve seen that actually delivers.) The site doesn’t only give you the option to create book covers either. You can create social media images, presentations, blog post images, professional-looking letterheads, magazine pages, certificates, desktop wallpapers, and album covers. With this site, and online picture editors like Befunky and Autodesk Pixlr, I’ve been able to create some pretty cool-looking book covers for some of my own books.

Free stock photos arranged and overlapped through the photo editors, uploaded into Canva, with some different filters applied, some cool fonts added, and presto! (Canva didn’t have all the photos I needed to create these covers so I went on Google Images, Pexels, and Pixabay.)

 

Asta and the Barbarians

 

For Asta and the Barbarians, the era or time period I was trying to imitate was similar to 19th century England. When looking for the pictures that best resembled the three main characters of the story, I made sure the clothing they were wearing was older and close to the style used in that time period. I didn’t know how much of each picture I was going to use but I was careful anyway, just in case I decided to use the whole body shot. The ship picture in the background was the trickiest. In the story, these characters are “blessed” with certain abilities; the mark of the “blessed” is golden eyes. I couldn’t apply a golden hue to the eyes of these characters (not without it being totally obvious that the gold was fake) so I found a background picture of a sunset with gold and orange hues instead. That way, the gold is still a prominent part of the book cover. That and the sunset makes it a tad bit more dramatic and pretty, no?

 

I Dare You to Love Me

 

I Dare You to Love Me was trickier. I couldn’t find a girl with dark curly hair and bright green eyes who looked just serious enough and just sad enough to resemble the picture of the female lead that I had in my head. Iris is grieving the loss of her father. She’s short-tempered, independent, and would do anything to protect her family. But she also has that fourteen-year-old girl inside of her that yearns for the freedom to be vulnerable without coming across as weak. The picture I ended up with was the closest match to what I wanted so I went with that. The locket and the beach are both significant in the book, so I knew right away that I needed to feature them on the cover. I hoped the locket especially would entice some sense of curiosity.

 

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In the Dark was harder still. This is a paranormal/urban fantasy involving werewolves, the mafia, and a kidnapping. It was easy enough to find the images I wanted to use (you have to use a full moon for a werewolf story). Lindsay spends most of the book worrying about the safety of her brother (the one who was kidnapped) and wondering about her feelings for the male lead (Wayne, guy with the silver eyes). The picture of this blonde woman, I thought, had the perfect combination of worry and thoughtfulness. Wayne was the easiest picture to find; most male models have that brooding look down. It was the arrangement of all these photos that I had trouble with. The full moon picture with the silvery blue clouds was beautiful and breathtaking on its own. But inserting the two main characters in there without the lines of silver and blue obscuring their faces proved problematic. (If you check out the excerpt of the story I have on my website here, you’ll see that there is a similar image on it’s page but that one has wolves in it. I wanted to keep the wolves for this book cover, but I just ran out of room.) Eventually, after much fiddling, I ended up with the final result.

(Right about now, some of you are wondering, “What is the point of all this? You just said you weren’t going to self-publish your books. Why are you putting so much time and effort into making covers for them?” The answer is simple: social media promotion. I’m trying to build my readership through my social media accounts, and I need an image to post with the quote/reader’s review/comment. My books may not be published yet but, with the help of writer’s forums, I can post content there and herd traffic to those sites through social media. Like when browsing through the bookstore or library, readers scrolling through book promotion sites or their homepages are going to stop and take a second look if they stumble upon an amazing book cover.)

 

 

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The Sentinel’s Test was by far the hardest cover I’ve made. It took me hours to find the right pictures to convey the magical aspects of this story. (The main character is a faerie elemental who can control fire and she lives on an island filled with other magical creatures.) I knew I wanted the girl to have her back turned like this, but I couldn’t seem to find a red headed girl in this pose. I ended up finding a close up of a red head’s hair just after it was cut, and had to combine that picture with a picture of a blond with her back turned. Once the pictures were merged and the extra parts erased, it was only a matter of finding the right kind of wings and the balls of fire. (In the book, the main character’s wings appear to be made out of smoke, but this was the closest I could get to that.) Despite it all, I’m very pleased with the result.

So what’s the point?

As She Latitude so eloquently pointed out in her post, there are a lot of book cover turn-offs today. Why? I have no idea. With the rise of self-published authors who have complete creative control of what their books look and sound like, shouldn’t there be a rise in unique book covers as well? It takes time and work, but making a unique, good quality, eye-catching cover is totally doable. If I can do it, without formal education or photo editing knowledge, others can most certainly do it! I’d say it’s high time we start a new trend of book covers that actually cater to the audiences we’re writing for and represent the overall themes of our stories. Who’s with me?